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Why did the English Church prove so vulnerable to the Reformation? M. Young

Why did the English Church prove so vulnerable to the Reformation?

M. Young

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7 pages
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 About the Book 

In October 1529 King Henry VIII of England summoned Parliament, that which was later to be known as the Reformation Parliament. This formally began the proceedings which would see the breaking away of the Church of England from the papacy and beganMoreIn October 1529 King Henry VIII of England summoned Parliament, that which was later to be known as the Reformation Parliament. This formally began the proceedings which would see the breaking away of the Church of England from the papacy and began the doctrinal drift from Roman Catholicism. The break from Rome was not by itself a ‘Reformation’ but a set of political changes which preceded significant religious changes over the course of the next century. This sharp reversal in fortunes for the Catholic Church, which had influenced affairs in nations across Europe for centuries, was a shock and an indication of the weakness of the Catholic Church at large. The Reformation as a whole was undoubtedly linked in part to the growing prominence of Lutheran principles, but the apparent ease with which Henry extracted the claws of popery from English ecclesiastical affairs is indicative of a vulnerability in the Church in England specifically which must be assessed in and of itself.This essay examines why Henry VIII was able to so easily accomplish his Reformation and in doing so questions the mainstream view of the English Reformation.